Griggs-Smith-Staples Cemetery

Griggs-Smith-Staples Family Cemetery - Mississippi County 03-17-2016This tiny, well-kept cemetery earned a whoa-back, if not a U-turn when I was driving down Hwy HH in Mississippi county. (Click on it to make it larger.)

Some name confusion

Griggs-Smith-Staples Family Cemetery - Mississippi County 03-17-2016There’s an inlay into the steps leading up to the graveyard that says “Smith-Griggs,” but this marker calls it the Griggs, Smith and Staples Family Cemetery. It was established in 1866.

I couldn’t find much information on it. FindAGrave lists 30 interments.

Morley Mystery Marker

Morley 12-03-2015I was photographing the Morley Community Building – a structure that may have been a bank in an earlier life – and looked down at my feet to see a strange disk that looked like a survey marker. The only thing is that I had never seen one that looked exactly like this one.

Who or what was Norman Lambert?

Morley 12-03-2015The round marker bore “Norman Lambert” across the top, some indecipherable marks in the middle, an arrow which pointed approximately north and “LS 1492” or “LS 1402” on the bottom. Click on the photo to make it larger.

A Google search for that name turned up two references: a 2008 Missourian story said the Scott county commissioners met with Norman Lambert of Lambert Engineering and Surveying, engineer for the Scott County Consolidated Drainage District No. 2, during their regular meeting Tuesday. He’s a logical candidate, but I still don’t know what the marker marks.

The other Norman Lambert to pop up was the Lambert who first started tossing rolls in Lambert’s Cafe, which eventually became known as the Home of Throwed Rolls.

Center has seen better days

Morley 12-03-2015A peek through the glass front door shows that the roof must be leaking. It’s a shame that such a beautiful building from the outside is being allowed to deteriorate inside.

City dates back to 1868 or 1869

Morley 12-03-2015Depending on which source you believe, the city was laid out in 1868 or 1869 by John Morley, a railroad engineer (the civil kind, not the kind that blows a whistle), and it was named for him.

Railroads intersected here

Morley 12-03-2015The Iron Mountain Railroad and Louis Houck’s M&A Railroad intersected here. Later, the Missouri Pacific would pass through the town.

Cotton gins are gone

Morley 12-03-2015Melons and cotton were important crops in the latter part of the 19th Century and into the 20th. Several cotton gins were built in the town, but none remain today.

These silos are still dominate the skyline, though.

 

 

 

Holland, Missouri

Holland 11-24-2015The two most prominent feature in many Bootheel communities include the city limits sign and the water tower. Holland, in Pemiscot county, is not exception. Click on the photos to make them larger.

Population 229

Holland 11-24-2015The 2010 population of Holland was 229 people in 98 households and 62 families. In the 2000 census, the numbers were 246, 96 and 71.

May have been named for J.W. Holland

Holland 11-24-2015

Place Names of Six Southeast Counties of Missouri identifies Holland as a town in the eastern part of Holland Township on the Frisco Railroad. The first known settlement, which was made in 1871, was known as Middleburg because it was midway between Upper Cowskin (later known as Covington), and Cooter.

The town was laid out in 1902 by J.C. Winters and J.W. Holland and named for the latter. A post office was established in the same year. No proof exists for Eaton’s statement that the town was so named because, like much of the country of Holland, it was built on reclaimed land formerly submerged; however, the selection of Mr. Holland’s name rather than Mr. Winter’s was doubtless influenced by the name of the country.

Unusual house

Holland 11-24-2015The first thing I saw when I drove into Holland was a pair of strange-shaped houses, apparently abandoned. My guide, David Kelley, said the builder was trying to provide housing with a bare minimum of materials. Instead of a single building, this one is a series of rooms joined together by hallways.

 

Road Warriorette Reactions

NN north of Bertrand 12-03-2015All of my road warriorettes display different reactions to my driving. Foodie Jan is prone to scream “We’re all going to die!!!!” at the least provocation. She’s also the one most likely to question my food and lodging choices.

Curator Jessica is so young she still thinks she’s immortal, so she takes my driving quietly.

You haven’t heard much about Warriorette Anne lately because she abandoned me for Texas. She kept quiet even when she had good reason to scream. It was on that occasion that Mother, the original Warriorette, said she didn’t scream because she was biting down too hard on a pillow to keep from doing it.

(You can click on the photos to make them larger.)

Now that I think of it

Suspension pipeline from Grand Tower IL 07-17-2011I only knew of one time when Mother expressed any kind of shock.

I was trying to get a good photo of the world’s longest suspension pipeline that links Wittenberg, Mo., with Grand Tower, Ill. I had been there about an hour earlier and got some nice pictures, but after heading north along the river and not finding a good angle, I decided to race the sun back for this shot. I made it with about five minutes to spare. When I went airborne over the top of a levee, Mother yelled, “Whoa!

I knew there was a road on the other side of the levee, but she, evidently, didn’t.

At the time, I wrote, “She never yells, ‘Whoa!’ She yells, ‘Gun it!’ She must be getting old.”

Getting to the point of the picture

NN north of Bertrand 12-03-2015Getting back to the original subject of the tree photo at the top of the page: Warriorette Shari, my old high school girlfriend (briefly, by her choice), and I were hammer down on NN north of where I took the silo picture when I smoked the brakes and did a sliding U-turn. Shari didn’t say a word, even when I pulled off on the side of the road and jumped out.

I had spotted a farm pond that was perfectly smooth and picking up the reflection of trees backlit by the setting sun. It captured the feel of The Bootheel for me: the endless flat ground, the green crops, the trees and buildings way off in the distance.

When I crawled back in the car, I tried to explain my philosophy of “Shoot It When You See It” because I was losing the reflections of the trees in the three or four minutes it took me to get turned around and start making exposures.

This old tree standing sentinel in the field has the same feel as the pond photo, but I like the reflections better in the first shot.

I almost always use a circular polarizing filter on my lens to protect it, reduce reflections and make skies more dramatic. Depending on the angle of the light, sometimes it doesn’t work at all or, like here, it causes part of the sky to be a different shade, which bothers me.