Heartland Materials Aerial

Aerials - Fruitland - Jackson 08-13-2014When I’m northbound on I-55 just south of Fruitland, I can’t keep from swiveling my neck to see how much bigger the hole on the east side of the road has grown.

Ernie Chiles and I did a flyover on August 13, 2014, to get a good look at it. The building with the blue roof in Saxony Lutheran High School.

A closer look

Aerials - Fruitland - Jackson 08-13-2014Here’s a view from the northwest looking southeast. I-55 is on the right.

I’ve done quite a few quarry stories. Here are some of them (including at least one where I misidentified the Fruitland quarries).

 

St. John’s United Church of Christ

St. John's United Church of Christ - Fruitland 04-15-2014While Mother and I were roaming around Jackson and Fruitland, we came upon a shiny white church off Hwy FF that had a cemetery behind it. I hate to disappoint some of you, but that orange orb isn’t a UFO or a spirit materialization: it’s just an internal reflection caused by shooting into the sun.

We had a busy day. Before getting to St. John’s, we visited

Church and cemetery photo gallery

I couldn’t find much information on the church and its cemetery, so I’ll offer up this photo gallery and count on you to tell me more about it. I’m particularly curious about what kind of plant that is. (Wife Lila thinks it’s a Dogwood.)

Click on any photo to make it larger, then use your arrow keys to move through the gallery.

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church 04-15-2014While we were on our ramble to find the Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad depot in Fruitland, and and being distracted by dandelions, we ended up on 541 east of Hwy 61 on a lane that took us up to the Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church. The door was locked, so I couldn’t go inside.

Church established in 1838

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church 04-15-2014A sign in front of the well-preserved church proclaimed it was established in 1838.

Cemetery dates to 1839

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church 04-15-2014A stone in the cemetery said it was established a year after the church

Visitor register in mailbox

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church 04-15-2014I opened a mailbox marked “Visitors,” expecting to find a brochure or other information about the church. Instead, there was a notebook started in 1990 where visitors could leave messages.

Dialog with the dead

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church 04-15-2014I leafed through a few pages of the molding and watermarked notebook and found that many of the writers had left what could best be described as dialogues with the dead. After awhile, I felt like I was intruding, listening to a private conversation at the next dinner table, and I put the book back.

It was the first time I’ve encountered that.

Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church photo gallery

If you want to know more about the church, Pleasant Hill and Fruitland, James Baughn did a great job of covering those subjects back in 2012. Rather than doing a bunch of cutting and pasting and pretending I was doing research, I encourage you to visit his blog.

Click on any photo to make it larger, then use your arrow keys or click on the sides of the photos to move through the gallery.

Fruitland Railroad Depot

Fruitland Houck Railroad depot 04-15-2014Reader Keith Robinson tipped me off about Fruitland having a railroad depot dating back to the Louis Houck days, but it took me some time to get around to looking for it. After a couple of false starts, I ran across this building that had stonework that looked a lot like the depot and headquarters building on Independence Street near Lorimier School. It was located, appropriately enough, on Depot Road.

I knocked on the door to see if the resident knew the history of the building, but nobody answered.

Remnant of  the Cape Girardeau Northern

Fruitland Houck Railroad depot 04-15-2014I sent a copy of the picture to Keith to confirm that I was at the right place.

He replied, “Yes, that is the old Fruitland depot of the Cape Girardeau Northern. As far as I know the depot was built in either 1905 or 1906 when the Cape Girardeau & Chester (a predecessor Houck railroad) entered Fruitland on the way to St Genevieve. The CG&C failed and the CGN came into being in 1913. It suspended operations in 1919, with the track being removed through Jackson, Fruitland and north in 1920. Houck wanted the Frisco to buy the railroad in 1912 – 1913, but the Frisco went into receivership before that deal could be put together. Had that deal been consummated, the Frisco probably would have developed the line to have a way to avoid the river route during flood times. In that case, the towns along that line may have gotten a boost to develop further.

Keith pointed me to an excellent James Baughn blog in The Missourian that has lots of factoids about Southeast Missouri railroading.