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Cape Central High Photos

Ken Steinhoff, Cape Girardeau Central High School Class of 1965, was a photographer for The Tiger and The Girardot, and was on the staff of The Capaha Arrow and The Sagamore at Southeast Missouri State University. He worked as a photographer / reporter (among other things) at The Jackson Pioneer and The Southeast Missourian.

Come here to see photos and read stories (mostly true) about coming of age in Southeast Missouri in the 1960s.

Please comment on the articles when you see I have left out a bit of history, forgotten a name or when your memory of a circumstance conflicts with mine. (My mother says her stories have improved now that more and more of the folks who could contradict her have died off.) Your information helps to make this a wonderful archive and may end up in book form.


Trinity School Then and Now

Trinity Lutheran School 05-20-1967The wooden treads on these steps at Trinity Lutheran School had been hollowed out by generations of children, me included, going and down them. There was something special about those old dark steps, kept shiny by diligent janitors.

In case you were wondering, no, we didn’t have a super-strict dress code. These kids were probably on their way to or from Sunday School.

Wood replaced by steel

Trinity Lutheran School 03-14-2010I’m glad to see the building is still there, but the wooden stairwells have been replaced by modern construction materials. I suppose they are easier to maintain and are a lot safer in case of a fire, but I bet they don’t have those creaks and squeaks I remember.

Playground was gravel

Trinity Lutheran School 03-14-2010When I was in the lower grades, this playground was gravel. In fact, when I was in the lower grades, I don’t think the the two-story classroom building on the left had been built yet.

The tall building in the middle housed classrooms and administrative offices. The reddish brick building to the right was the gym / auditorium, with the cafeteria in the basement.

George Alt House being wrecked

Demolition of Trinity Hall, AKA the George Alt House, 12-23-1967I wrote about the history of the George Alt House, also known as Trinity Hall, last year. I could understand tearing the building down because of maintenance issues and a need for more space, but I was disappointed that the fine woodwork and windows weren’t salvaged.

Here are photos of the wrecking ball at work.

4 comments to Trinity School Then and Now

  • Tim Pensel

    I remember all of those creaks and squeaks as well! And the true JOY of hitting a softball over the fence into the street, stopping all action until ball retrieval.

  • Mary (Lewis) Schaefer

    I also remember the smells of food mixed with the smells of the old wood floors and steps. I guess I was weird but loved the smell of the cafeteria food… and the special dinners being cooked by one ladies aid or the other (like the chicken pie dinner)

  • Blondie

    Thanks for posting the photo of the stairway. I remember those stairs so well, and actually think of the worn down spots in the wood from decades of steps quite often. I also took more then a little of gravel from the playground home in my knees and elbows! What a dangerous playground that was! But I loved it!

  • John Hente

    Ah, yes. who could forget the smells. the noises, and sights of old Trinity School. As far as Trinity hall, how many folks who had recess, before the hall was torn down, remember the dangers of running to first base, only to have to jump up on the comcrete rear porch of the old hall? a rear challenge. Ah. “the good ole days.”

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