Even Her Mug Shot Is Cute

Lila Perry Steinhoff's SEMO ID cardNot everybody can look cute in a mug shot with a number under their chin.

Had Wife Lila elected a life of crime, the FBI would have had a tough time keeping her picture on the Post Office walls because teenage boys would have been snagging them to hang next to their Farrah Fawcett and Cheryl Tiegs posters.

Pre-politically correct SEMO

Lila Perry Steinhoff's SEMO ID cardThis Southeast Missouri State College ID was issued while the school still had a newspaper called The Capaha Arrow, a yearbook named The Sagamore, and Chief Sagamore was a fixture at all the football games.

I removed Lila’s Social Security number and birth year to thwart ID thieves. I don’t know what all the holes that are punched out signify. The top evidently refers to the school year, but I don’t what the 1 through 25 boxes are for.

Here’s what happened to Chief Sagamore.

Capaha Arrow turns 100 as The Arrow

Valentine’s Day Fashion Show

SEMO Valentine's Day fashion show c 1966When I posted a photo of a couple of women all gussied up walking on the SEMO campus a few days ago, several readers speculated about why they were all dressed up.

Jean Lanham said she thought they were headed to a luncheon featuring a fashion show usually held on Valentine’s Day. Based on the hearts decorating the room and on some of the pins, I think she nailed it.

A pretty subdued group

Maybe I missed the happy times, but this gallery contains a a mighty somber looking crew. Click on any photo to make it larger, then use your arrow keys to move around.

 

Hats, Furs and Gloves

Semo campus c 1966Remember the day when women wore furs, white gloves and hats? These women were captured on the SEMO campus sometime around 1966. I have no idea who they are or where they were heading.

I’m also confused by what the woman behind them is dragging on a leash. Maybe it’s a fur collar that got away.

How to stay up to date

I posted the following note last night and had several people tell me the link didn’t work. I reported the problem to Kid Matt. He gave me his usual verbal shrug over the telephone that conveys, “So?” then he went on to fix it like he always does. He gave me some long explanation about having to refill the throckmartin tank because the hamsters had eaten all the koala berries, or something like that. Anyway, it’s fixed.

I used to be able to post links to new stories on Facebook, but FB has changed the way it delivers status info to your timeline. If you “liked” a page in the past, you would get updates delivered to you. Now, FB is playing games to force folks like me to pay to “boost” our posts. If we don’t pay, only about 10% of my readers receive status reports.

Here’s an easy and free way to stay up to date on my new posts: sign up for the blog’s email notification service. It’s free, you get only one notice a day and I promise not to spam you. It’s as easy as clicking on THIS LINK or the “Manage Subscriptions” link at the top left of the page.

I don’t need Facebook when I have loyal readers.

Arthur Mattingly Brought History to Life

Arthur Mattingly, history prof, SEMO c 1966When Jim Stone headed off to Ohio University, he and I would trade audio tapes instead of letters. It’s almost painful to listen to the two of us half a century later, but I was playing part of one the other day and heard myself describing my history prof: “He’s talking when he walks into the room, and he’s still talking when the bell rings and people are walking out.”

That was Arthur Mattingly, one of the best profs I had at SEMO or Ohio University.

Founded historic preservation program with Dr. Nickell

The Missourian had a story in 2006 saying that Dr. Mattingly and Dr. Frank Nickell were being recognized for founding SEMO’s historic preservation program 25 years earlier. A 1973 article he wrote does the best job I’ve ever read in explaining the value of historic preservation and how “old” doesn’t always translate into valuable.

Taught history in present tense

Arthur Mattingly, history prof, SEMO c 1966 One of the things I liked about him was that he delighted in debunking all those myths about history that we had been taught from grade school on. His accounts of battles were told in the present tense. He didn’t dwell on dates and troop movements, he made you feel like the enemy was going to come up over that rise any minute.

He, John C. Bierk, and Fred Goodwin are three SEMO profs I remember well.

Things are going to slow down here

I got a call from a perky and squealing Curator Jessica this morning. A grant we had applied for to put on a week-long workshop in Athens, Ohio, in August was approved. Since I really hadn’t expected it to get funded, I drug my feet on preparing for it.

I have to pull together an update for my Smelterville project by July, figure out what I’m going to do convince a bunch of amateur photographers that shooting pictures today with history in mind is fun, and knock off my Last Generation project for an Immigration Conference in Altenburg in October.

To get everything done, I’m going to have to throw some babies out of the lifeboat. I can’t give up food, sleep and afternoon naps, so it’ll be blog posts that go splash. I may plug in re-runs so you don’t forget about me.

Sign up for email notifications

Facebook has become an unreliable way to promote the blog. Unless I pay them, less than 10% of the people who like the Central High School blog fan page ever see the status posts. To make sure you don’t miss out on new material, click on the tiny MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS link at the top left of the page (next to Archive). Put in your email address and you’re in business. Or, you can sign up by clicking on THIS LINK.