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Cape Central High Photos

Ken Steinhoff, Cape Girardeau Central High School Class of 1965, was a photographer for The Tiger and The Girardot, and was on the staff of The Capaha Arrow and The Sagamore at Southeast Missouri State University. He worked as a photographer / reporter (among other things) at The Jackson Pioneer and The Southeast Missourian.

Come here to see photos and read stories (mostly true) about coming of age in Southeast Missouri in the 1960s.

Please comment on the articles when you see I have left out a bit of history, forgotten a name or when your memory of a circumstance conflicts with mine. (My mother says her stories have improved now that more and more of the folks who could contradict her have died off.) Your information helps to make this a wonderful archive and may end up in book form.


Rerun: Barber Shops

Cape Girardeau Barber Ed UngerOne of my first scans was barber Ed Unger giving a young boy a haircut. Ed started cutting hair in 1935 and kept going until he retired in 1983.

The thing I liked about him was that he let me read my comic book in his chair.

This post is where I figured out that a photo doesn’t have to be technically great to be good memory touchstone.

Click on the links to read the whole story and see more pictures.

Stylerite Barber Shop

Ken Steinhoff  self portrait in old Stylerite Barber Shop 312 S Sprigg 10-24-2011In 2011, I got permission to go into the old Stylerite Barber Shop at 312 South Sprigg, Ed’s old shop, and the one where I dropped many a hair on the floor. (I probably should have held onto a few of those.)

I took a self-portrait in the mirror where I had stared back at a much younger, comic-book-holding Ken half a century earlier. I don’t know for a fact that it was the same mirror, but I like to think it was hanging there waiting for my return.

Both posts attracted some good comments.

Sisco’s and Skinner’s

1967 Achievement - Cape Ricardos 47 I made some extra money when I came home on Christmas break in 1967 by roaming around taking pictures of buildings for the upcoming Missourian Achievement Edition.

Among the targets was the Sisco’s Professional Barber Salon next to Ricardo’s Italian Swiss Chalet Ristorante in the 700 block of Broadway.

I also snapped Skinner’s Barber shop next to Eggiman’s Authorized Dealer of Maytag and Admiral Appliances on South Plaza Way. The shop must have had a short life, because it didn’t even show up in the 1969 City Directory.

 

10 comments to Rerun: Barber Shops

  • Andy Pemberton

    I must have missed the earlier Ed Unger posts. So I just had the pleasure of reading them. They are great. Ed Unger was my barber all through the “growing up in Cape” years. I echo all the comments made in the earlier posts. Hello to fellow Troop 10ers: Dave, “Pep”, Cory.

    There were words of wisdom posted near those barbershop mirrors. IIRC, one read “Old fishermen never die, they just smell that way”. Those years were closer to Douglas MacArthur’s famous farewell speech.

    Here in the outskirts of Boston, my barber of 30+ years also keeps his lawn in pristine condition. That must be the sign of a great barber!

  • Terry Hopkins

    I had my haircuts at Campus and the Varsity both on Broadway…Gaines was my barber most of my teenage and early twenties. The shoe shine guy at the Eaker’s shop across from the Esquire was where I learned that the shoe shine guy really did not shine many shoes, but always seems to live pretty well. Handicapping is real art, and when used by a master usually means you will not win many bets. Remember, they do not build all those hotels in Vegas with the money the winners take home…These are all things I learned while getting a haircut. Andy Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and Happy Holiday!

  • Brune Time Observation

    BRUNE TIME 2015 HAIR REPORT:

    In the 1950’s the four Brune boys were marched into “Mr. Carter’s” walk-down basement barbershop on Main Street every 4-6 weeks to be “skinned” with the ever popular “Crew Cut”. aka: sheared like a sheep. I can’t remember if Carter’s was the name of the shop, but since we had to chime in unison before leaving “thank you Mr. Carter”… that was surely his name.

    I believe Mr. Carter gave Mom a group rate – and we were in and out in 15 minutes. Sometimes that included a ‘free trim’ for Mom who wore here hair very short for a while in those days. When the late 50’s-60’s arrived with the more trendy “Flat Top” our bulk rate went up a bit to compensate for more time for precise measurement and the cost of some ‘Butch Wax’.

    In the mid 60’s when we could walk to get haircuts on our own…. Campus Barbershop on Broadway with Jim & Woody became our personal choice. Campus Barber shop was later moved to the corner of West End Blvd & Independence and became CAMPUS AUTO SALES & SERVICE which is still in operation. They soon gave up the hair cutting as the Auto business grew quickly and Jim and Woody just didn’t have time…. unless you were one of their buddies, and then they would ‘fit you in’ if possible. The had a lot of ‘buddies’ – especially if you were an athlete and the team was having a good year.

    However… I haven’t “Paid for a Haircut” since 1986 when the world famous FLOWBE VACU-SUCK HAIRCUTTING SYSTEM was invented and appeared on late night TV for $69.99. After perfecting my craft on myself, I have serviced at – NO CHARGE – myself, my kids, a few drunk friends, my father, my mother, male grand-kid Ellis, all of my many DOGS, and many, many State of MO foster kids that I worked with in my counseling practice. That way they could ‘keep’ their ‘hair cut money’ from the foster parents or social services and I would keep them spruced up.

    In the past 30 years… I conservatively estimate I have cost the “Barber & Pet Salon Business” around $450,000.

    So….. I got that goin for me.

    The Flowbee is an electrically powered vacuum cleaner attachment made for cutting hair. It was developed and filed for patent in 1986 by Rick E. Hunts, a San Diego, California carpenter.

    SEE YOU-TUBE: World’s Greatest Inventions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VizAMSRooLc

  • larry points

    Does anyone remember a Mr. Seabaugh, located below the courthouse? He gave me a pretty nifty flat-top when that was all the rage (mercifully not for long). His daughter was Brenda?

    • Hank

      I had quite a few haircuts by Orville Seabaugh also. I think his shop was down on Spanish Street…. Later on I had my hair cut by Bill Sisco who is still cutting hair in a shop on Independence just a stone’s throw from his old shop on Broadway….

  • Mark Stuart

    I went to Willis Seagraves for many years, until he started taking appointments. I then went to Dave and Harlen’s Barber Shop on Plaza Way, until they closed earlier this year.

    • That was a wise move. I mean, what kind of self-respecting barber takes appointments.

      I go to a three-barber shop and count on the middle guy, Larry, to whip my hair and beard into submission.

      When you walk in, there might be eight or ten guys waiting. It’s tough keeping track of exactly where you are in line since new people come in and the guys who were there before you will step out to make a call or grab a smoke.

      The strain is quite taxing.

  • Brune Time Observation

    Brune Time Observation
    December 30, 2014 at 1:42 pm · Reply
    BRUNE TIME 2015 HAIR REPORT:

    In the 1950’s the four Brune boys were marched into “Mr. Carter’s” walk-down basement barbershop on Main Street every 4-6 weeks to be “skinned” with the ever popular “Crew Cut”. aka: sheared like a sheep. I can’t remember if Carter’s was the name of the shop, but since we had to chime in unison before leaving “thank you Mr. Carter”… that was surely his name.

    I believe Mr. Carter gave Mom a group rate – and we were in and out in 15 minutes. Sometimes that included a ‘free trim’ for Mom who wore here hair very short for a while in those days. When the late 50’s-60’s arrived with the more trendy “Flat Top” our bulk rate went up a bit to compensate for more time for precise measurement and the cost of some ‘Butch Wax’.

    In the mid 60’s when we could walk to get haircuts on our own…. Campus Barbershop on Broadway with Jim & Woody became our personal choice. Campus Barber shop was later moved to the corner of West End Blvd & Independence and became CAMPUS AUTO SALES & SERVICE which is still in operation. They soon gave up the hair cutting as the Auto business grew quickly and Jim and Woody just didn’t have time…. unless you were one of their buddies, and then they would ‘fit you in’ if possible. The had a lot of ‘buddies’ – especially if you were an athlete and the team was having a good year.

    However… I haven’t “Paid for a Haircut” since 1986 when the world famous FLOWBE VACU-SUCK HAIRCUTTING SYSTEM was invented and appeared on late night TV for $69.99. After perfecting my craft on myself, I have serviced at – NO CHARGE – myself, my kids, a few drunk friends, my father, my mother, male grand-kid Ellis, all of my many DOGS, and many, many State of MO foster kids that I worked with in my counseling practice. That way they could ‘keep’ their ‘hair cut money’ from the foster parents or social services and I would keep them spruced up.

    In the past 30 years… I conservatively estimate I have cost the “Barber & Pet Salon Business” around $450,000.

    So….. I got that goin for me.

    The Flowbee is an electrically powered vacuum cleaner attachment made for cutting hair. It was developed and filed for patent in 1986 by Rick E. Hunts, a San Diego, California carpenter.

    SEE YOU-TUBE: World’s Greatest Inventions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VizAMSRooLc

  • Walter Lamkin

    I was a “Sisco Kid” early in life, but then did the flat-top evolution over to Campus where they could make some time with my double cowlicks. What was in that pink Butch Wax anyway? I recall having a small aluminum (I suspect) comb which I kept in my pocket, but soap and water would remove the residue of the wax. Looking for some enlightenment from the expert, Brad Brune.

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