Support Ken

Click here to support Ken Steinhoff through your Amazon purchases.

Purchases made at Amazon.com from that link put 6% of the total transaction price in Dad's pocket at no additional cost to you. You're going to shop online anyway, right? Do it through Amazon.com to support this web site.

Or, if you'd rather just send him a random amount of money, you can do that too...







Cape Central High Photos

Ken Steinhoff, Cape Girardeau Central High School Class of 1965, was a photographer for The Tiger and The Girardot, and was on the staff of The Capaha Arrow and The Sagamore at Southeast Missouri State University. He worked as a photographer / reporter (among other things) at The Jackson Pioneer and The Southeast Missourian.

Come here to see photos and read stories (mostly true) about coming of age in Southeast Missouri in the 1960s.

Please comment on the articles when you see I have left out a bit of history, forgotten a name or when your memory of a circumstance conflicts with mine. (My mother says her stories have improved now that more and more of the folks who could contradict her have died off.) Your information helps to make this a wonderful archive and may end up in book form.


American Queen

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013I see in The Missourian that The American Queen has stopped in Cape again. I shot her when she paused there July 7, 2013. You can click on the photos to make them larger.

Ambassador of the Boat

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013

There’s a security checkpoint at the gangplank to keep non-passengers from boarding. I’d like to nominate this guy as Ambassador of the Boat. He’s the crewman who has to tell folks, “No, you can’t tour The American Queen” and to answer hundreds of dumb questions from guys like me (and worse).

I looked at his name badge and said, “Your name is Ronald Watchman, right?”

“No, Watchman is my title; my name is Ronald Moore.” Watchman Moore retired from the Memphis fire service after more than three decades as a firefighter. After about a year, he was bored with retirement and applied for a job on The Queen. He was hired almost immediately as a porter.(A percentage of the crew must hail from the home port of Memphis.)

After a short period of time, the captain called him aside and said that his skills were being wasted as a porter, and he was promoted to work security.

He’s a good-humored fellow who enjoys chatting with people and seemed to know every passenger by sight. It was clear from the way they spoke to him that he was well-liked. If he’s typical of the rest of the crew, service must be first-rate.

“I’m a character”

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013Passenger Lesa Knight, center, said, “I’m a character.”

“Most folks I run into are characters, so I’m not surprised.” I replied.

“No,” she protested, “I’m REALLY a character. I wear a penguin costume at the St. Louis Zoo.”

I couldn’t argue with that.

Bikes on board

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013I spotted several fluorescent green bikes on the streets in Cape. It turned out that they were bikes carried on board for the passengers to use when the boat docked. I asked one passenger who was returning to the boat how he liked climbing the Broadway hill. He admitted that he had walked up the hill, but it was worth it to be able to see some of the landmarks in the Tour of Rush brochure.

I should have confined our conversation to biking. He didn’t share Wife Lila’s Uncle Ray’s opinion of Rush as a “horse’s patootie.”

Tour buses followed The Queen to all if its stops to take passengers sightseeing and shopping. If a passenger literally “misses the boat,” it’ll haul them to the next stop so they aren’t left on the riverbank, Watchman Moore said.

American Queen built in 1995

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013I was surprised to learn The American Queen was built in 1995. It reminded me of the Delta Queen docking in Cairo in 1968.

The company that built it went under (a bad choice of words for a steamship company), and it was laid up until 2008 when it was refurbished. Most of the reviews I read were gushingly favorable, but a few folks weren’t happy with various things on their cruises. It seems like most of those were in the early days when service and mechanical issues were being worked out.

Some folks can find fault with anything. The boat has to take on water from the shore more often than fuel. One of the last things the crew did before shoving off was to disconnect the hose feeding Cape water into the storage tanks. A non-passenger on the shore commented, “I’d never sail on that boat. I saw them drop the water hose into the river when they were pulling it in.”

“Do you realize that up until recently all the drinking water in Cape came out of that river?” I asked.

Stacks lower

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013Because the level of the river fluctuates, some stops have to be bypassed when the water is either to high or too low to dock. The stacks are designed to lower if they need clearance to go under some bridges.

Rooms open onto decks

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013Some of the cabins have private balconies, but most of the reviewers liked being able to walk directly out on the decks to mingle with other passengers.

Boat has elevators

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013Unlike early riverboats, The American Queen has elevators to make the boat handicapped accessible. Since it sounds like there are a lot of passengers in their 70s and 80s, that’s important. Getting onto and off the boat can be a bit tricky for those with mobility issues, the review warned.

Good view from the top decks

American Queen Riverboat 07-07-2013This view from the Common Pleas Courthouse shows how The Queen towers over many of the downtown buildings.

 

 

10 comments to American Queen

  • Dennis Mize

    Have you been to Cincinatti during Tall Stacks festival?
    lots of “steam boats”. Looks odd to see them with their stacks folded down. Love you site.

  • Bill Stone

    A Mississippi cruise is on our bucket list!

  • Mary Jean Rodgers Harmon

    Dennis, it is Cincinnati. I have lived here for 40 plus years. The Delta Queen was no longer allowed to carry overnight passengers because of its wooden hull so they built the American Queen (and the another boat, I think the Mississippi Queen.) I used to live in an apartment on a hill overlooking downtown Cincinnati. When the Delta Queen came home it was a big deal and she started playing the calliope well away from the City. I would love to sit on my balcony and hear the music and watch her come into the dock. It was so sad when she wasn’t coming on a regular basis any more.

  • Joe Whitright

    As I have said before, as a small boy back in the 1930’s, I used to go aboard this type of river boat and sell Sunday papers to the passengers. Sometimes , there would be as many as three of them at a time tied up down at the foot of Broadway, {before the floodwall was built}! Those were the good old days in the beautiful ” City of ROSES as cape was then known.
    Joe Whitright

  • David Dalton

    Kind of surprised you didn’t grow up on well water. We did, living on the outskirts of town.

  • Mary E Moore

    I am Ronald Moore’s wife. And, I am very pleased to say how proud I am of him. His charisma never goes unnoticed, at home or away! Although I miss him when he is not home, while working on the boat, I realize I must share him with others whose day he brightens with his easy smile. It is nice to be the “First Lady to the Ambassador of the American Queen!”

    Kudos to my husband, Ambassador Ronald Moore!

  • Carol Martin

    Mr. Ron, Mr Ron. Now they know what I know about. Your joy, peace, gentleness, self control, faithfulness and love. Kudos to you “Mr. watchman”.

  • Rosie Odum

    Awesome Guy; well deserved and agree totally that we are proud of Mr. Ambassador, definitely a class act on and off the “American Queen”. Kudos, Bro. Ron….

  • […] down Broadway to shoot the empty lot where the former First National Bank sat and discovered the American Queen riverboat was docked on the […]

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>