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Cape Central High Photos

Ken Steinhoff, Cape Girardeau Central High School Class of 1965, was a photographer for The Tiger and The Girardot, and was on the staff of The Capaha Arrow and The Sagamore at Southeast Missouri State University. He worked as a photographer / reporter (among other things) at The Jackson Pioneer and The Southeast Missourian.

Come here to see photos and read stories (mostly true) about coming of age in Southeast Missouri in the 1960s.

Please comment on the articles when you see I have left out a bit of history, forgotten a name or when your memory of a circumstance conflicts with mine. (My mother says her stories have improved now that more and more of the folks who could contradict her have died off.) Your information helps to make this a wonderful archive and may end up in book form.


Old Marble Hill School

Marble Hill School 11-07-2013When I was in Marble Hill in 2013 to shoot the artesian well we used to stop at on the way to Camp Lewallen, I noticed that the old Mable Hill School had been boarded up.

The room and exterior walls look like they are in good shape. I don’t know when the building stopped being used.

Built by the WPA

Marble Hill School 11-07-2013 An inscription on the over the front door says that it was erected 1939-40 by Work Projects Admn, another one of those stimulus programs that helped employee workers during the Depression and created so many buildings still in use today.

  • On November 17, 1933, the school board purchased a new piano for the school.
  • A December 12, 1935, story reported that 29 pupils were enrolled in the school.
  • A January 17, 1940, Missourian brief said that classes for the Marble Hill grade school would be held at the old Will Mayfield College administration building because the old building is being razed for a new building.
  • Third grader Jimmy Smith, 8, who had been in a polio isolation ward at St. Francis Hospital was improved enough that he could see his parents. He became ill Tuesday and he was admitted to the hospital on Thursday. His left leg was affected by paralysis.
  • Fifteen pupils were graduated from the eighth grade of Marble Hill Grade School in May of 1956.
  • In 1957, about 60 members of the seventh and eighth grade were taken by bus for a skating party at the Jackson roller rink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 comments to Old Marble Hill School

  • Dennis G. Parham

    My wife taught at the school until it was closed due to an addition build at Woodland. She absolutely loved teaching there. The building was bought by a local businessman.

  • Tim Ward

    I grew up in Marble Hil-Lutesville and attended first and second grades at the Marble Hill School (1960-1962). Some years later, my family moved right across the street in a historic house that had been a dormitory for the Will Mayfield College, so I continued to play there on the playground and catch the bus there to ride up to the “new school” where grades 3 – 12 were housed. I still have fond memories of that building and the neighborhood in which it sits. My understanding is that it was bought by Lloyd Ivey, an area native who moved away and then returned to the area. Plans for continued use were abandoned due to asbestos in the building. I still think it could be made into really neat “loft” apartments.

  • I grew up in Marble Hil-Lutesville and attended first and second grades at the Marble Hill School (1960-1962). Some years later, my family moved right across the street in a historic house that had been a dormitory for the Will Mayfield College, so I continued to play there on the playground and catch the bus there to ride up to the “new school” where grades 3 – 12 were housed. I still have fond memories of that building and the neighborhood in which it sits. My understanding is that it was bought by Lloyd Ivey, an area native who moved away and then returned to the area. Plans for continued use were abandoned due to asbestos in the building. I still think it could be made into really neat “loft” apartments.

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